• Dana Lazarof

World Teacher's Day

Vlad Rekhson, Ryan Brookwell and Naama Levy .


This month on the 5th of October we will be celebrating World Teacher’s Day – so we decided to honor some of our more prominent Educators from across the Globe.


Currently in 2020, ChessMatec is being taught to more than 200,000 students in over 1000 Schools spread throughout the World! Our comprehensive curriculum provides teachers with prepared lessons for beginner and intermediate students, and the necessary tools to easily create classrooms, import students, and see helpful metrics.


Today – we are giving the stage to some of ChessMatec’s leading Chess Teachers – Vlad Rekhson and Ryan Brookwell from Canada, and Naama from Israel!


Vlad Rekhson is a Chess Teacher that uses the ChessMatec program in Canada! We asked him a couple of questions so that you can get to know him too!



Where are you from? Tell us a little bit about yourself and your experience in chess training.


Currently I live in Canada. I played chess since I was a kid, but never planned to become a chess teacher. After I started teaching Chess (kind of by accident), I had fun and wanted to do it full time. Eventually I quit my previous job, got a Degree in Education and started working in a school full time as a Chess Teacher.


How long have you been teaching Chess to kids?


About 10 years.


What tools do you use to teach chess to young kids?


I use the ChessMatec App and the ChessMatec Online platform, Alterman books, lichess.org, Chessbase and Chess Tutor.


What do you like about ChessMatec?


I like the exciting exercises and the fact that kids get immediate feedback on how they do.


What is your favorite Theme to teach Children?


My favorite theme is Scholar's mate. I usually know who listened and who didn't at the end of the lesson when they start playing against each other!


What is the biggest challenge in teaching young kids?


The biggest challenge is making it fun for the kids and helping them improve their game all at the same time.


What is your secret to being an awesome Chess Teacher?


The only tip and the best tip I can give you is - love what you do.


What is a piece of advice you can give to parents/teachers who are just starting to teach young kids chess?


Make it fun! Chess doesn’t need to be boring or hard – and there are great tools out there and ways to make the game and the learning process exciting!






Ryan Brookwell is Chess Teacher from Calgary, Canada who teaches Chess using the ChessMatec program and principles to kids starting from just THREE years old!



Where are you from? Tell us a little bit about yourself and your experience in chess training.


I am from Calgary, Canada. I have always enjoyed chess and puzzles, but my primary experience is teaching early childhood education, so I have never played ranked chess.


How long have you been teaching Chess to kids?


I have been teaching chess for one year now.


What tools do you use to teach chess to young kids?


I use many materials to teach my chess lessons throughout the year. I like to ensure the kids get a wide variety of different stimuli each time, so I like to change it up regularly. The tools that I use regularly include storytelling, the ChessMatec app, Videos on the ChessMatec Campus for Teachers, coloring, playing chess games using normal a regular Chessboard and pieces, passing around manipulatives including rocks, envelopes, and packages; and playing variants of popular games such as hide and seek, and tag.


What do you like about ChessMatec?


What I like the most about ChessMatec is that I can use Chess as a vehicle to teach the kids about sharing, taking turns, and developing their emotional awareness and social skills. Then, when they enjoy my lessons, they start to want to learn about Chess even on their own time.

What is the biggest challenge in teaching young kids?


My biggest challenge working with the young kids is that if a child decides that you aren't interesting, then it can be very difficult to recapture their attention. I always try to be the most interesting thing in the room.


What is your secret to being an awesome Chess Teacher?


Be very aware of your body language and attention in class. I always pay the most attention to the children who are behaving well and listening nicely, and I make sure they have my full attention. The kids learn to vie for my attention by behaving well and listening, and I let an assistant or their primary teacher deal with children who misbehave. The kids will also want to mimic you so be sure to speak to the kids politely and give them your full attention when they speak, and they will learn to return the favor while you are teaching.